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Designing for Death and Apocalypse: Theodicy of Networks and Uncanny Archives
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Designing for Death and Apocalypse: Theodicy of Networks and Uncanny Archives

Author: Denisa Kera
Edition/Format: Article Article : English
Publication:The Information Society, v29 n3 (May-June 2013): 177-183
  Peer-reviewed
Database:Taylor and Francis Journals
Other Databases: British Library SerialsElsevier
Summary:
Recent design and art experiments with software, hardware, and emergent biotechnologies reflect upon the uncanny relation between death and technology and generate some unique responses to human mortality and possible apocalypse. By looking at how these projects push the limits of what is considered a proper burial, tribute, memorialization, and archiving, we can better understand our individual and collective  Read more...
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Details

Document Type: Article
All Authors / Contributors: Denisa Kera
ISSN:0197-2243
DOI: 10.1080/01972243.2013.777307
Language Note: English
Unique Identifier: 5136523695
Awards:

Abstract:

Recent design and art experiments with software, hardware, and emergent biotechnologies reflect upon the uncanny relation between death and technology and generate some unique responses to human mortality and possible apocalypse. By looking at how these projects push the limits of what is considered a proper burial, tribute, memorialization, and archiving, we can better understand our individual and collective responses to mortality and explore some unexpected uses of technologies.
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